Sable Mountain

Hiked Sable Mountain with Bill and Diane Schor on 8/30/2016. It was a bright sunny day although a bit more humid than was predicted. Sable is southwest of the popular North and South Baldfaces in the Evans Notch area. We hiked 3.5 miles up the Baldface Circle and Slippery Brook trails before we started the bushwhack to Sable. There is a long abandoned trail to Sable from South Baldface that we were hoping to find and we did eventually did locate it after some rather tough navigating spruce. We started the bushwhack at the junction of the Slippery Brook trail and Baldface Knob trails.

Diane at the start of the bushwhack
Diane at the start of the bushwhack

We followed a herd path for a quarter of a mile but eventually lost it in a small swamp. We were headed for the low point between South Baldface and Sable and most of the way was through very nice areas of ferns and birch glades.

Bill and Diane in the ferns
Bill and Diane in the ferns
Birch Glade
Birch Glade

We were hoping to intersect with the abandoned Sable Mountain trail but couldn’t find it so we headed up the first knob of Sable. We ran into a cliff band which we got around by going around it to the west. It was tough going with thick spruce but we eventually got to the top of the knob and headed along the ridgeline to Sable. We found the old trail and were able to follow it to the summit of Sable which saved a lot of time and crawling through thick spruce. There was lots of evidence of moose including some bones and antlers.

Moose leg bone
Moose leg bone
Summit canister with moose antler
Summit canister with moose antler
Bill and Diane at the summit
Bill and Diane at the summit

We reached the summit at 2 PM after 5.5 hours of hiking and bushwhacking so we didn’t spend much time there as we wanted to get out before dark. We managed to find a better route back to the low spot between South Baldface and Sable so it didn’t take as long as it did on the way up.

South Baldface
South Baldface

We were easily able to follow our way back through the birch glades and ferns because of the ferns we had trampled on the way up.

Wooded summit of Sable
Wooded summit of Sable

Noticed some plants with fall berries that I hadn’t seen on the way up.

Blue Bead Lily and Bunchberry
Blue Bead Lily and Bunchberry
Hobble Bush berries
Hobble Bush berries

We got back to the parking lot at 7 PM which was a half hour before sunset, it was a long day. Only 24 peaks left to complete the New Hampshire 100 Highest.

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West Field

Hiked West Field on 8/25/16 with Bill and Diane Schor. The day started out bright and sunny with a chance of showers in the late afternoon. We started the bushwhack portion of the hike on the A-Z trail at 3100′. It was pretty thick spruce at first but then we went up a stream bed for a while that was easy and then we had a really good stretch of mossy pretty open forest.

Diane leading the way through a nice forest
Diane leading the way through a nice forest

There wasn’t much of note in the forest except the occasional Indian Pipe.

Indian Pipe
Indian Pipe

We reached the summit after an hour and a half of bushwhacking and quickly found the summit canister and signed in. The most recent visitor was on 8/5/16. We enjoyed our PBJs and then returned back to the A-Z trail and hiked out just beating the rain. Only 25 left to complete the New Hampshire 100 Highest.

West Field summit canister
West Field summit canister

Middle and West Long

Hiked Middle and West Long on 8/19/2016 with Bill and Diane Schor and Bill Cronin. Weather was perfect with bright blue skies temps in the seventies and a slight breeze and there weren’t any bugs. We drove up Nash Stream road and then turned onto Trio Ponds Road until it was gated. Walked up .3 miles and then turned on to an old logging road which we followed for about a mile. The map showed the road as ending but it seemed to keep going. We turned and entered the woods heading for Middle Long. The woods were pretty open and it was easy walking. There was lots of sign of moose including some trees where they had rubbed the velvet off their antlers.

Moose rubbing tree
Moose rubbing tree

We reached the summit of Middle Long and found the summit canister and signed in and enjoyed our PBJs.

Middle Long summit canister
Middle Long summit canister
Me on Middle Long
Me on Middle Long

After lunch we set off for West Long via Long Mountain Pond. This is a small pond at 3400 feet that some people hike up to and fish. The water level looked to be low with the lack of rainfall.

Long Mountain Pond
Long Mountain Pond

We then headed for West Long and we again encountered lots of moose evidence including some antlers.

Moose antler chewed by mice
Moose antler chewed by mice

We reached the summit and had a snack before the hike down.

West Long sumitt canister
West Long summit canister
Bill and Diane checking the map
Bill and Diane checking the map
Bunchberry on the summit
Bunchberry on the summit

We headed down and luckily ran into the same old logging road that must have come up to near the pond. We followed that all the way down to the road which certainly made the trip easier and faster.

Bill and Diane leaving the woods.
Bill and Diane leaving the woods.

Only 26 more to finish the New Hampshire 100 Highest.

Mt. Clough

Hiked Mt. Clough with Bill Schor on 8/16/16. It was a pretty humid day and we got sprinkled on a couple of times but nothing that got us very wet. Mt. Clough is just west of Moosilaukee and is all bushwack, no trails at all. It was only about 4 miles roundtrip but took us 5 hours with only a brief stop for lunch. At first we had nice open woods that was easy to navigate through then it got steep but still open woods. Then it remained somewhat steep with smaller spruce. Then we hit some small cliffs we had to go around.

Small cliff we had to navigate around
Small cliff we had to navigate around

There were some views on the way up but none at the wooded summit.

South Moosilaukee
South Moosilaukee
Hazy view to the south
Hazy view to the south

There were hundreds of mushrooms in the spruce forest many of which were rotting in place. This one was looking pretty healthy.

Purple mushroom
Purple mushroom

After going around a big blowdown area that would have been very difficult to go through we reached the flat wooded summit. We found the canister and signed in and then enjoyed our PBJs. There were lots of bunchberries at the summit which added a bit of color.

Summit canister with a small moose antler
Summit canister with a small moose antler
Me at the summit with the bushwackers badge of blood on my arm
Me at the summit with the bushwhackers badge of blood on my arm
Bunchberries
Bunchberries

We returned back to the road a different way that was shorter than the way up and didn’t have any blowdowns but there was a short steep section of nasty spruce that slowed us down a bit. Only 28 left on the New Hampshire 100 Highest. Map of our route courtesy of Bill Schor.

GPS trak of our route
GPS track of our route

 

Vose Spur

Hiked Vose Spur on 8/11/2016 with Bill Cronin. Weather was predicted to be hot and humid but it wasn’t as bad as I thought it would be but there was still a lot of sweating involved. This is both a New Hampshire 100 Highest and New England 100 Highest peak. We hiked the Signal Ridge trail and then the Carrigain Notch trail to get to the start of the bushwack. The start of the bushwack is just past a large rock on the Carrigain Notch trail and there is a herd path that heads off into the woods. We ate our PBJs here as we had gotten a late start. We were able to follow this all the way up to 3000 feet. We lost the herd path a few times but were able to find it and keep on going. At 3000 feet another herd path came in from the left and we followed that pretty easily all the way to the bottom of the talus slope. There are 3 cairns on the talus slope and if you follow them you will easily find where the trail goes back into the woods. There were good views from the talus slope.

Bill climbing the talus slope
Bill climbing the talus slope
View looking toward Chorcorua from the talus slope
View looking toward Chorcorua from the talus slope

After the talus slope the trail became quite steep for a while but then flattened out as we neared the summit. There is the usual canister at the summit to sign but there is also a very nice addition that was welcome after the steep hike.

Vose Spur summit cannister
Vose Spur summit canister
Vose Spur summit chair
Vose Spur summit chair

We made our way back to Carrigain Notch trail although we lost the herd path about a quarter mile before the trail. We made it with no problems. Only 29 left for the Hew Hampshire 100 Highest and 27 for the New England 100 Highest.