Mt. Clinton Trail

Hiked the Mt. Clinton trail on 5/29/2016 with Bill Cronin. It was a cloudy day with temps in the 60s with a threat of showers but it never did rain on us. The bugs stayed away for the most part. The Mt. Clinton trail is a poorly maintained and poorly marked trail, we saw one blaze in its entire length. It connects the Dry River trail to the Mizpah Springs Hut and sees very little use, partly because of its condition. We started out on the Dry River trail and hiked in 2.9 miles to the start of the Mt. Clinton trail.

Bridge over Dry River on the Dry River trail
Bridge over Dry River on the Dry River trail

We were thankful for this bridge as it would have been tough to get across and keep your feet dry.

Start of the Mt. Clinton trail
Start of the Mt. Clinton trail

Because were in the Presidential Range – Dry River Wilderness it was good to see a trail sign as they aren’t always present in a designated wilderness. The crossing of the Dry River here was a little tough but we managed to get across with mostly dry feet. On the far side the trail stayed in the river bed for a few hundred feet and then entered the woods where there was some old orange flagging present. We could follow the faint foot tread and there was some occasional flagging that helped us to stay on course. We did lose the trail once in this low section but were able to get back on the trail with a little searching. The trail is not very photogenic and no views but there were a few waterfalls.

Small waterfall on the Mt. Clinton trail
Small waterfall on the Mt. Clinton trail
Bill building a small cairn at a crossing
Bill building a small cairn at a crossing

The trail was quite muddy and in places was a stream bed. The upper part of the trail was much easier to follow although the rocks were covered with moss and they were pretty slippery. We reached the hut and ate our PBJs sitting outside on the rocks. The only wildlife siting of the day was a mouse running across the kitchen floor inside the hut. Because Bill needed some more redlining we took the long way back to the car. Taking the Dry River Cutoff to the Mt. Eisenhower trail back to the Dry River trail and back to the car. The final crossing of the Dry River was a bit treacherous, I went up stream a bit and found a better place but Bill crossed at the crossing and got both feet wet. We hiked 13.3 miles and I got 2.5 miles of redlining. Only 3.5 miles left and 2 hikes.

 

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